World Youth Skills Day (WYSD) 2021 is celebrated on 15th July every year. It’s objective is to spread awareness about technical, vocational education training, and the development of other skills relevant to both local and global economies. In the article below read more about World Youth Skills Day history, its 2021 theme, significance, and events, etc.

15 July 2021, online, 11:00 am to 12:30pm EDT Register Here

World Youth Skills Day 2021 will celebrate the resilience and creativity of youth throughout the crisis. A virtual event, organized by the Permanent Missions of Sri Lanka and Portugal to the UN, the Office of the Secretary-General’s Envoy on Youth, UNESCO and ILO, will offer an opportunity to reflect on skills that are needed today and for the future. Participants will take stock of how the TVET sector has adapted to the pandemic and recession, think of how TVET institutions can participate in the recovery, and imagine priorities they should adopt for the post-COVID-19 world.

Reimagining Youth Skills Post-Pandemic

In 2014, the United Nations General Assembly declared 15 July as World Youth Skills Day “WYSD”, to celebrate the strategic importance of equipping young people with skills for employment, decent work and entrepreneurship. Since then, World Youth Skills Day events have provided a unique opportunity for dialogue between young people, technical and vocational education and training (TVET) institutions, firms, employers’ and workers’ organizations, policymakers and development partners.

World Youth Skills Day 2021 will take place in a challenging context, with the continuation of the COVID-19 pandemic resulting in the widespread disruption of the TVET sector. While vaccination rollouts offer some hope, TVET still has a long road to recovery, especially in those countries which continue to be overwhelmed by the spread of the disease. Youth skills development will face a range of unfamiliar problems emerging from a crisis where training has been disrupted in an unprecedented manner on a virtually universal scale.

The day also highlights the important role of skilled youth in addressing current and future global challenges. It is known that Skill India is an initiative of the central government which was launched to empower the youth skill and make them more employable and more productive in their work environment.

Young people aged 15-24 are particularly exposed to the socio-economic consequences of the pandemic. School and workplace closures are leading to learning and training losses. Major life-cycle transitions are made difficult if not impossible, including graduation from general education or TVET at secondary or tertiary level, residential autonomy, and labour market insertion.

TVET has a key role to play in fostering the resilience of young people. It is crucial for all stakeholders to ensure the continuity of skills development and to introduce training programmes to bridge skills gaps. Solutions need to be reimagined in a way that considers not only the realities of the present, but also the full range of possibilities for the future.

 Theme and Event

The theme of World Youth Skills Day 2021 is “Reimagining Youth Skills Post Pandemic”. The Permanent Missions of Sri Lanka and Portugal to the UN, the Office of the Secretary-General’s Envoy on Youth, UNESCO, and ILO will organise a virtual event that will offer an opportunity to reflect on skills that are needed today and for the future. The day takes place in a challenging context, with the continuation of the COVID-19 pandemic and resulting in the widespread disruption of the TVET sector.

In 2020, the online panel discussion will be organised focussing on skills for a Resilient Youth in the Era of COVID-19 and beyond. Various virtual events focused on the theme of “Skills for a Resilient Youth”. The impact of COVID-19 crisis on skills development and therefore to explore strategies in response to the unfolding economic crisis. This will help in preparing young people to develop their capacities to respond to rapid changes in employment and entrepreneurship in sectors that are hardest hit by the crisis. Therefore we can say that this in the long term is to adapt skills development systems to changes in the economy of the world that the COVID-19 pandemic and recession will bring. 

Technical and Vocational Education and Training

In the 2030 Agenda, education and training are central to achieve. The vision of the Incheon Declaration: Education 2030 is fully captured by Sustainable Development Goal 4 “Ensure comprehensive and equitable quality education and develop lifelong learning opportunities for all”.

Education 2030 imparts attention to technical and vocational skills development, mainly approach to affordable quality Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET). With this the acquisition of technical and vocational skills of employment, decent work, and entrepreneurship; the elimination of gender disparity, and ensuring access for the vulnerable. 

TVET addresses the various demands of an economic, social, and environmental nature by helping youth and adults in developing the skills that are required for employment, decent work and entrepreneurship. It also promotes equitable, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, and supporting transitions to green economies and environmental sustainability.

It also helps in providing the skills required for self-employment. TVET also improves the responsiveness to changing demand in skills by companies and communities, increases productivity, and increases wage levels. It reduces the access barriers to the world of work via work-based learning, and ensuring that skills gained are recognised and certified.

For low-skilled people also TVET offers skills development opportunities who are under-or-unemployed, out of school youth, and individuals not in education, employment, and training (NEETs). 

World Youth Skills Day 2020: Key facts

– In the whole world, one in five people is NEET that is not in employment, education, and training. Three out of four young NEETs are women.

– Between 1997 and 2017, the young population grew by 139 million and the population of the youth labour force shrank by 58.7 million.

– Almost 2 out of 5 young workers in emerging and developing economies live on less than US$3.10 a day.

– Before the current crisis, young people were 3 times as likely as adults (25 years and older) to be unemployed. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, currently, more than 1 in 6 young people are out of work.

– For more than 100 years, blending distance learning with practical skills development has proved effective in TVET. In 1910, due to typhoid epidemic and so an urgent need arise, Australia introduced its first distance TVET courses to train health inspectors by correspondence while they worked.